INWARD GUIDE


Hopeful live because

The future is true. Don’t believe in a lie, that only today is yours

Your spirit knows the future,

accurately. Stop guessing and

Follow this inward guide.

You could live in the present basking In the future others dream about.

The beauty of life is being able to enjoy the moment by moment experiences and

Still, be able to hold the horn of the future with certainty.

The future shouldn’t be blurry.

It can only be blurry in your soul’s pilgrimage thoughts. Yes, life will be blurry against your reasoning power because all the answers are not there

Caught in the labyrinth of my imagination, I pause. Oh, pilgrim friend, save me from self

Your spirit has no worries of tomorrow, regardless of the impossibilities life brings

Because this inward guide has travelled into the future that scares our common logic

Follow this inward guide. Illuminate your path with clarity, confidence and courage

Nothing is impossible for the spirit. Dimensions and channels of the future is available. No boundaries, no limits when God leads

I pray thee, O

Inward guide, illuminate my darkness, lead me home.

This ain’t the ordinary kind of life. This is found only in the Eternal life

“I have yet many things to say unto you, but ye cannot bear them now. Howbeit when he, the Spirit of truth, is come, he will guide you into all truth: for he shall not speak of himself; but whatsoever he shall hear, that shall he speak: and he will show you things to come.” (John 16:12-13 KJVAE)

‘Avatar: The Last Airbender’: Zuko’s Scars and Ours


Avatar is a record-breaking cult classic. No, not the blockbuster film nor the lamentable movie remake, but the animated TV show that debuted in 2005 and recently resurfaced on Netflix.

Avatar: The Last Airbender is a coming-of-age story about a preteen protagonist (Aang) and his friends who seek to end an ongoing war to restore peace on earth. Along the way, they adventure in a fantasy world and discover themselves. But the antagonist’s character arc is undeniably the best. 

Warning: spoilers ahead!

Scarred by Shame

Zuko is a 13-year-old banished from his country by his father (Fire Lord Ozai, king of the Fire Nation) because he dares to speak up against his father’s orders in a war meeting. Zuko may only return from exile and restore his honor under one impossible condition: capture the Avatar (Aang) who has been missing for 100 years. Zuko’s shame is manifested on his face—a glaring burn scar over his left eye from his abusive dad. Though determined to capture the Avatar, Zuko slowly discovers the surprising path he must take to overcome his shame.

The Asia-inspired world of Avatar is the perfect backdrop to highlight honor and shame. Yet shame is universal. Ed Welch defines shame as “that all-too-human experience of worthlessness, failure and not belonging. It can come from what we have done or from what others have done to us.” If guilt tells us we’ve done something bad, shame tells us we are bad, dirty, and unlovable—irredeemably so. Shame shapes our identity and keeps us in hiding (Gen. 2:25; 3:7–8).

If guilt tells us we’ve done something bad, shame tells us we arebad, dirty, and unlovable—irredeemably so. 

Like the leper’s spots (Luke 5:12) and the woman’s persistent blood (Luke 8:43), Zuko’s scar is a constant reminder that he is a failure, a disgrace, a shame.

Scars of shame show up all over Scripture. Look for the outcasts—the Hagars, the Leahs, the barren, the lepers, the tax collectors, the poor—and you’ll see that shame is often God’s preferred setting for redemption (Luke 4:18–19; 7:21–22).

Suffering Servant

Thankfully for Zuko, he doesn’t travel alone. His empathetic, humorous, tea-loving uncle Iroh accompanies him. Iroh gently questions his attitude and decisions, at one point declaring, “Zuko, you must let go of your feelings of shame if you want your anger to go away.”

Iroh is a legendary warrior and the true heir to the Fire Nation throne, but he chooses the disgraced life of a suffering servant to accompany his banished nephew. He reminds us of “the King of glory . . . the LORD, mighty in battle” who became the Suffering Servant, “despised and rejected by men . . . acquainted with grief” (Ps. 24:8Isa. 53:3).

Opting for the lowest rung on the social ladder, Jesus touched the untouchables (Matt. 8:3Mark 7:32–34Luke 7:14–15) and befriended those defined by shame (Luke 7:34).

Stubborn Shame

Yet Zuko’s shame is not easily overcome. At a personal crossroads, Iroh tells Zuko, “You are going through a metamorphosis, my nephew. It will not be a pleasant experience, but when you come out of it, you will be the beautiful prince you were always meant to be.” 

Shame is stubborn. It can’t be purged by material success, positive thinking, or self-affirmation. “Release from shame cannot be earned,” Welch observes. “It comes by being connected to someone of infinite worth.” 

Zuko’s painful metamorphosis from disgraced prince to beloved son hinges on his association with his honorable but dishonored uncle, rather than with his honored but dishonorable father. But he learns this the hard way.

Victimized Victimizer

At a crucial crossroads, Zuko finally corners the Avatar. The chance to restore his honor is within his grasp. But there’s a catch: he has to turn on the only person who ever truly loved him—Iroh. Zuko chooses partnership with his manipulative and murderous sister, Azula, who becomes his advocate before their father. Iroh, in turn, is thrown into prison.

Zuko finally sits at his father’s right hand, but he can’t shake his overwhelming angst. Shame still imprisons him. And when he realizes who he has dishonored, he is wrecked.

At the cross, Jesus was utterly victimized—denied, slandered, abused, abandoned, cursed, and crucified. We can and should see ourselves in Christ’s victimization (Isa. 53:4), but since he bore our sin (1 Pet. 2:24) we must also see ourselves in his victimizers.

We can and should see ourselves in Christ’s victimization, but since he bore our sin we must also see ourselves in his victimizers. 

When Zuko witnesses his uncle’s victimization—caused by his own betrayal—he forges a new path toward honor. He forfeits his royalty to join the Avatar and his friends as they wage war against Zuko’s father. First, though, he must find his uncle, who escaped from prison.

Remaining Scar

In a scene doubtless influenced by the parable of the lost son (Luke 15:11–24), Zuko rehearses his apology before begging for forgiveness. Before he can finish, Uncle Iroh wraps him in a tear-filled embrace and declares, “I was never angry with you. I was sad because I was afraid you’d lost your way.”

With Iroh and his new community, Zuko helps the Avatar win the war. He’s crowned as Fire Lord Zuko. But his scar remains—no longer a symbol of shame but a testament to redemption.

We have scars, too. Is the gospel good-enough news to redeem the scars of our victimizing and our victimization? Christ’s scars shout a resounding, “Yes!” (John 20:27). 

Shame’s grip isn’t broken through our striving, but by our association with the King who became the ultimate outcast (Luke 18:32–33Gal. 3:13). On the cross, he took our shame (Heb. 12:2); at his resurrection, he gave us his honor (John 20:171 Cor. 15:57).

Will we hide our scars or hope in his? 

In Mandarin, the name “Zuko” can mean “failure” or “loved one.” His story is every Christian’s story (Isa. 62:4). Christ’s wounds transform our scars of shame into glorious trophies of grace.

Will we hide our scars or hope in his?

By Quina Aragon |https://www.thegospelcoalition.org

Poisôn & Gracè


You’ll Live Through Many Deaths Before You Cross The Ivory Bridge To Cessation.

Dear God,

Just the thought of loving

my enemies is like poison

inside my belly. But I am

willing to die to self

So that grace will triumph

applaudere


Humans applause;

a soothing rainfall in

summer. the soul labours

and desperately yearn for

it. unfortunately, it is

intermittent


I want to be able to say;

”T’was thy satisfaction I lived.

T’was your glory I lived

This is what I rehearse every day

on this pilgrim path.

Because this is what

I want to evoke when I stand before you.


The true essence of life is to be satisfied and grounded by the satisfaction of God, as a true custodian of heavenly policies


For my orientation, I chased after embers in fading skies. I became a slave to the noise within my own heart when the music distorted. when the applause faded into thin air.


I was taught;

”thunderous applause is your crown of victory. It is your validation of exustence”


So I lived, every day;

Aching for the ovations, the endorsement, the approval, and the acceptance of mortals, to validate my significance


Who hates the rain when it is wild and agreeable to the soul’s desires? No one!

Sadly, it’s not lasting. I won’t succumb to it. Deep inside the walls of our own souls, the unfading handwriting is clear; ”YOU ARE WHAT I ADORE.


This benevolence is unloaded, so we travel with empty bags; the applause of men

INFLUX


There is a reason I never gave up. Because love never gave up on me


Metals are pliable under heat. The wildflower leaps in ethereal appeal; aligned with the sun. The soul is agile and majestic when it mingles with love


Men give up on men, but love do not. Love is not a man. man, he only animates love if he’s acquainted with love. Man in itself is a decay. The best of men is death and corruption; without love. He is fragile and most often than not he acts from the impulse of decay, when love is not his orientation


There is a reason love is patient and kind. Absolutely, nothing under Gods skies makes love pull back and sit over the fence. He goes to war with you, even to the depths of hell, holding your soul in comfort, and in hope, until the fire, his restore is set at your feet to run to where your name is engraved


the reason I’ll never give up in life. I know where love dwells, and I know how to stand under it’s crystalline fountain until my heart is one with all it has to offer


Then there are the carriers of love. There are selfless entities whose pleasure are tied up to how many times they let others in, to drink from their golden cups. their ego dust has been buried under the dust. They do not live for themselves, yet do they not deprive themselves of their share. Their life mission is to live for others as conduits of the ocean.


– Ag. McDaniels | Influx Of Love | June 10, 2020

Harbingers Lullabies


Personally, Mothers days are one of those special occasions I spiritually connect with single mothers, and all the women who don’t have kids they could call their own. To some women mothers day is a day of misery because it reminds them of their battles with a series of miscarriages, death, and disappointments in pregnancy. This poem is my heartfelt prayer and encouragement to you, who is battling in any of these areas. You are not alone. I honour and celebrate you from the depths of my heart. ➕💚



The voice of the moon:

a constant reminder to you

that you’ve not been left

alone, to stumble in the dark


Give her soft wings to Fly

Give her sunshine to Bloom


The weight of not having to carry

a child she will call her own

who would serenades her heart with

mama’s lullabies

depletes her soul every day,

especially today.


Give her soft wings to fly

Give her sunshine to bloom


She’d believed in a lie

That she’s not fruitful, that she’s not a mother

No one ever told her she’s the mother of the universe,

and the voice of the moon is a constant reminder,

that she’s not left alone in the dark, to stumble.


O’ moonchild, weary flower:

The universe is your Son, and

the moon is the messenger

of thy glad tidings.

You are not alone.

O’ mother of many nations


Photo Credit: Jenifer Yoswa